Middle School Parents Newsletter

  • Ease your child’s anxiety about high school

    Posted by Newsletter on 5/24/2020

    If your child will be going to high school next year, he may feel a bit nervous. Use the next few months to help ease the transition.

    To support your child:

    • Visit the new school together. There may be a special day planned for eighth-graders to visit. If not, call the school to schedule a tour.
    • Encourage him to talk to high school students and ask “What do you wish you had known before starting high school?”
    • Suggest he learns more about the types of extracurricular activities offered at the high school. He can check the school’s website and talk to current students.
    • Promote learning over the summer. Encourage your child to write about his experiences in a journal and read at least one novel recommended for ninth graders.
    • Reassure your child. Rather than talking about how challenging high school is going to be, remain positive. Say things like, “I know you’re going to be successful in high school.”

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2020 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2020 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

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  • Make sure your middle schooler keeps reading over the summer

    Posted by Newsletter on 5/17/2020

    When kids don’t read over the summer, they are at risk of losing some of their “word smarts.” To keep your middle schooler reading over summer break:

    • Walk the walk. Make reading a part of your daily life. Let your middle schooler see you leafing through magazines or choosing a thick novel over a TV show.
    • Read a few young adult books yourself. By exploring books written for kids your child’s age, you may get a better feel for what’s going on in his life and what topics might interest him. Ask a librarian for suggestions.
    • Share what you’re reading. Did you just come across an interesting article in the newspaper? Tell your middle schooler about it!
    • Respect that his interests are changing, and help him find books that reflect his new interests.
    • Don’t panic. Adolescence is all about change, so it’s normal for your middle schooler to lose interest in reading for a while. Just continue being enthusiastic about books, and chances are his enthusiasm will return.

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2020 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2020 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

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  • Use positive discipline to create a change in your child’s behavior

    Posted by Newsletter on 5/10/2020

    By middle school, your child has probably learned to tune out negative discipline, such as yelling. And you have probably realized that it doesn’t work anyway.

    This summer, take a positive approach instead. In return, you may see a positive change in your child’s behavior before school resumes in the fall.

    Here’s how to get started:

    • Be generally pleasant to your child, even if he is not. Smile. Show affection with a hug.
    • Notice what your child does right and compliment him.
    • Thank your child when he does something for you or the family. Say please when you ask him to do something.
    • Trust your child. If your child has been generally trustworthy, give him the benefit of the doubt. Believe what he says.
    • Send positive messages. If your child asks to go to a friend’s house, don’t say “Not until your room is clean.” Instead, say “Sure you can, as soon as your room is clean.”

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2020 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2020 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

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  • Encourage activities that lead to meaningful learning

    Posted by Newsletter on 5/3/2020

    Middle schoolers can find themselves with too much time on their hands when school is out. Here are some ideas to keep your child busy and learning:

    • Be a tourist in your town. Ask your child to research interesting places to visit where you live. Then, make plans to go.
    • Consider whether your child is ready to earn some money outside the home. If he is, pet care, babysitting, or helping a neighbor with yard work can help him learn responsibility.
    • Start a book club. Let your child pick a book. Read it together and set a date to talk about it. Suggest that he invite some of his friends.
    • Give your child a research project. Do you need to find the best price and model of a small appliance? Ask your child to research the options online.
    • Help your child learn to cook. Give him the responsibility of preparing a simple family meal at least once a week.

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2020 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2020 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

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