Middle School Parents Newsletter

  • Remind your child that there is no such thing as online privacy

    Posted by Newsletter on 11/24/2019

    Use of social media sites such as Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube is on the rise. Millions of middle school students have created accounts on social- networking sites to share their thoughts, photos and videos.

    However, experts warn parents about the dangers of children using social media. Adolescents often like to take risks and tend to have low impulse control—which is why it’s absolutely vital for parents to monitor what their kids post.

    To help your child make the best choices while on social media:

    • Talk to her about her online “friends.” The accounts your child creates should be viewed or followed only by people she allows.
    • Remind your child that nothing can ever be completely removed from the internet. She should think carefully before posting anything that would damage her reputation or someone’s friendship.
    • Talk about values. Remind your child that if she wouldn’t do or say something in real life, she should avoid doing it and saying it online.
    • Stress safety. Your child should never post information that would allow someone to locate her in real life. She should also never arrange to meet anyone she has met online.

    Reprinted with permission from the November 2019 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2019 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc. Source: V.L. Dunckley, M.D., “Why Social Media is Not Smart for Middle School Kids,” Psychology Today, niswc.com/mid_socialmedia3.

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  • A good night’s sleep is key to your child’s school success

    Posted by Newsletter on 11/17/2019

    Student reading A vital factor in your child’s education happens far outside the classroom. It’s sleep, and it’s critical to her success in school.

    Unfortunately, according to recent studies, 60% of middle school students do not get the recommended eight to 10 hours of sleep per night they need.

    To determine whether your child is getting enough shuteye, ask yourself:

    • Does she fall asleep within 30 minutes of going to bed?
    • Can she wake up fairly easily in the morning?
    • Is she alert all day—with no reports from school about her inability to focus in class?

    If you answered yes to each question, chances are your child is getting adequate sleep. But if you answered no, it’s time to:

    • Enforce a regular bedtime. Don’t let your child sleep in more than two hours past her normal wake time on the weekends.
    • Limit caffeine intake. Watch for this stimulant in things like soda, iced tea and energy drinks.
    • Ban late-night screen time. Research links lights from devices to problems sleeping.
    • Keep her cell phone and other digital devices out of her room overnight. Your child needs to be sleeping, not checking social media!

    Reprinted with permission from the November 2019 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2019 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc. Source: “Sleep in Middle and High School Students,” Centers or Disease Control and Prevention, niswc.com/mid_moresleep.

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  • Model and enforce the three C’s to teach your child about respect

    Posted by Newsletter on 11/10/2019

    Respect can be many things—but it always involves the three C’s: communication, courtesy and consideration. Practice these with your child and others—and expect your child to practice them in return:

    1. Communication. Respectful people ask others for their viewpoints, feelings and opinions. They accept that they may not agree, but that the other person’s ideas and needs have worth.
    2. Courtesy. Manners count, and please and thank you really are magic words.Tone  of voice matters, too. Respectful people know that how they say something is as important as what they say!
    3. Consideration. A respectful person moves from asking and listening to another’s concerns to thinking and acting in response to them. When you give your child downtime after she has had a hard day, that’s consideration, and shows respect. Or, if your child makes her own breakfast so you can sleep in on a Saturday, she is showing respect for you.

    Reprinted with permission from the November 2019 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2019 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

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