Middle School Parents Newsletter

  • Keep your child reading during summer break

    Posted by Newsletter on 6/9/2019

    One of the best ways to reduce summer learning loss is to read. But how can you keep your middle schooler reading over the summer months? Here are several strategies to try:

    • Visit the library. Encourage your child to check out more than books. Walk by the magazine rack and stop to let him browse. Or if you are planning a summer trip, ask him to pick out a few audiobooks to listen to as you travel. Open up as many avenues for literacy as possible.
    • Challenge your child. If the teacher hands out a summer reading list, issue a challenge: If your child reads one or two extra books on the list, he will earn a special treat.
    • Ask the librarian what other kids are reading. Authors such as J.K. Rowling of the Harry Potter series and Rick Riordan of the Percy Jackson & the Olympians series have helped to make reading cool among preteens. If there is a new popular book out, suggest your child read it, too.
    • Encourage your child to start a summer reading group. Members can share books, then get together to discuss their reactions to what they’ve read.
    • Set an example. Let your middle schooler see you leafing through magazines or reading a novel over watching a TV show.
      Share what you’re reading. Did you just read an interesting article? Tell your child about it.

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2019 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2019 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

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  • Middle schoolers still need structure over the summer

    Posted by Newsletter on 6/2/2019

    Summer usually offers more freedom for your child. This is promising for her, but it requires more oversight from you. 

    During the school year, you generally know where your child is and what she is doing during certain hours. That may not be as true during the summer months. 

    To set the stage for a safe summer: 

    • Establish rules with your child at the beginning of summer. Rules should cover exactly where she is allowed to go, with whom and when. Let her know that any exceptions need to be discussed and approved by you in advance. 
    • Do not allow your child to “go hang out with the girls.” Ask her, “Which girls?” She shouldn’t be hanging out with anyone you don’t know. Ask to meet her friends and find out their ages. In general, middle school students should not be spending unsupervised recreational time with high school students, especially with those in the upper grades. 
    • Establish consequences for breaking the rules. Make sure the consequences fit “the crime.” For example, if your child comes in late, she may have to stay in the house the next night. 
    • Keep your child busy! Enroll her in a summer learning program or camp. Help her research interesting internship opportunities. Suggest she start her own business babysitting children, walking dogs or mowing lawns. She could even take an online class. 

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2019 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2019 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc. 

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  • Volunteering helps your middle schooler make a difference

    Posted by Newsletter on 5/26/2019

    Summer usually offers more freedom for your child. This is promising for her, but it requires more oversight from you.

    During the school year, you generally know where your child is and what she is doing during certain hours. That may not be as true during the summer months.

    To set the stage for a safe summer:

    • Establish rules with your child at the beginning of summer. Rules should cover exactly where she is allowed to go, with whom and when. Let her know that any exceptions need to be discussed and approved by you in advance.
    • Do not allow your child to “go hang out with the girls.” Ask her, “Which girls?” She shouldn’t be hanging out with anyone you don’t know. Ask to meet her friends and find out their ages. In general, middle school students should not be spending unsupervised recreational time with high school students, especially with those in the upper grades.
    • Establish consequences for breaking the rules. Make sure the consequences fit “the crime.” For example, if your child comes in late, she may have to stay in the house the next night.
    • Keep your child busy! Enroll her in a summer learning program or camp. Help her research interesting internship opportunities. Suggest she start her own business babysitting children, walking dogs or mowing lawns. She could even take an online class.

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2019 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2019 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

    Comments (-1)