Middle School Parents Newsletter

  • Boost creativity & writing skills with a summer journal

    Posted by Newsletter on 7/28/2019

    As a middle schooler, your child is able to consider ideas and think in ways that wouldn’t have been possible when he was younger. Encourage him to record his thoughts and ideas in a journal this summer. It is a wonderful way to preserve his creative ideas.

    Give your child a notebook and suggest that he:

    • Make lists. What are his favorite songs, TV shows, books, meals or celebrities? It’s fun to look back on these later to see how his opinions have changed.
    • Write down everything he sees and does on a particular day.
    • Try fiction. Encourage him to write a story, song or poem.
    • Write about something that makes him laugh. Why does he find it so funny? Which of his friends has a similar sense of humor?
    • Write about his ideal day. How would it be different from his typical day? How would it be the same?

     

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2019 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2019 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

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  • Spend quality time with your middle schooler this summer

    Posted by Newsletter on 6/30/2019

    Family Summertime can be a wonderful family time. You may see your child more during the day. But even if you don’t, you can take advantage of the less stressful evenings.

    To spend time with your child this summer:

    • Establish a weekly family night. Cook a meal together, talk, play board games. Avoid screen time.
    • Ask for your child’s opinion. Many middle schoolers enjoy current events. Because kids this age tend to be idealistic and would like to “save the world,” they also have strong opinions. Take time to hear your child’s thoughts and ideas.
    • Hold regular family meetings to solve problems and share ideas about fun ways to spend time together.
    • Ask your child to join you when you go on errands.
    • Participate in family traditions. If you always go to the same park to watch fireworks or attend summer sports events in your town, keep doing it. No traditions? Brainstorm with your child and start some.

     

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2019 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2019 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

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  • Keep your child reading during summer break

    Posted by Newsletter on 6/9/2019

    One of the best ways to reduce summer learning loss is to read. But how can you keep your middle schooler reading over the summer months? Here are several strategies to try:

    • Visit the library. Encourage your child to check out more than books. Walk by the magazine rack and stop to let him browse. Or if you are planning a summer trip, ask him to pick out a few audiobooks to listen to as you travel. Open up as many avenues for literacy as possible.
    • Challenge your child. If the teacher hands out a summer reading list, issue a challenge: If your child reads one or two extra books on the list, he will earn a special treat.
    • Ask the librarian what other kids are reading. Authors such as J.K. Rowling of the Harry Potter series and Rick Riordan of the Percy Jackson & the Olympians series have helped to make reading cool among preteens. If there is a new popular book out, suggest your child read it, too.
    • Encourage your child to start a summer reading group. Members can share books, then get together to discuss their reactions to what they’ve read.
    • Set an example. Let your middle schooler see you leafing through magazines or reading a novel over watching a TV show.
      Share what you’re reading. Did you just read an interesting article? Tell your child about it.

    Reprinted with permission from the May 2019 issue of Parents Still make the difference!® (Middle School Edition) newsletter. Copyright © 2019 The Parent Institute®, a division of PaperClip Media, Inc.

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